No one can lose either the past or the future

Lake McDonald, Glacier National Park, Montana

Were you to live three thousand years, or even countless multitudes of that, keep in mind that no one ever loses a life other than the one they are living, and no one ever lives a life other than the one they are losing. The longest and the shortest life, then, amount to the same, for the present moment lasts the same for all and is all anyone possesses. No one can lose either the past or the future, for how can one be deprived of what’s not theirs?

Marcus Aurelius, Meditations, 2.14
Lake McDonald, Glacier National Park, Montana

January 1, 2018

It was the first day of 2018, January 1. A big snow had fallen two days before and we struggled to get up the North Fork Road to find a place to shoot skeet.  It was already getting dark when we made our way south, back to Columbia Falls.  As usually I was driving way too fast and just happened to see something on the east bank of the North Fork.  As the ABS engaged we slid to a stop and quickly reversed.  Turns out I didn’t need to rush, they were two Moose who had just crossed the river.  In fact, at first we thought there was just one but then the other stepped out from behind the first.  They were still for many minutes.  I imagine they waited for the chill of the freezing water to fade away from their numb legs.  Then, slowly they moved into Glacier National Park.  

Moose, North Fork of the Flathead River, Montana

It started to snow this weekend though the backcountry has been covered for a few weeks.  I can only imagine the slow hardship that winter is on animals.  It’s a silent death, or a narrow survival.  

The Lamar

The first time I went into the Lamar Valley of Yellowstone was in the winter of 1998-99. Despite the reintroduction of wolves in 1994, there were still huge herds of elk in the river bottom. I remember thousands and thousands of This past week the only elk in the Lamar Valley was a pile of dirty hide and red meat. The shapeless carcass was 150 yards off the road and we had heard that wolves were feeding on the lifeless mound. We were told to be there starting at pink sunset or before the blue dawn.

The Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

We arrived at 3, no sign of wolves. Other than the dozen bison on the North Ridge and a few black ravens in the trees dotted along the Lamar there was no sign of life anywhere. Clouds raced along to the south spitting snow. A few minutes of glassing around the valley revealed professional wildlife photographers on the ridge overlooking the carcass. They had spotting scopes the length of my arm and probably telephoto lenses equally as long.

Elk Carcass, Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Soon the wolves would appear, perhaps beginning with only one, circling, watching. By nightfall, the feast would begin. In a week the elk mound would be gone and another act of the Lamar Valley drama would begin.

Mule Deer, Paradise Valley, Montana